Hey, Miss!

[insert thought provoking comment here]

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Years ago I learned a very cool thing about Robin Williams, and I couldn’t watch a movie of his afterward without thinking of it. I never actually booked Robin Williams for an event, but I came close enough that his office sent over his rider. For those outside of the entertainment industry, a rider lists out an artist’s specific personal and technical needs for hosting them for an event, anything from bottled water and their green room to sound and lighting requirements. You can learn a lot about a person from their rider. This is where rocks bands list their requirement for green M&Ms (which is actually a surprisingly smart thing to do). This is also where a famous environmentalist requires a large gas-guzzling private jet to fly to the event city, but then requires an electric or hybrid car to take said environmentalist to the event venue when in view of the public.
When I got Robin Williams’ rider, I was very surprised by what I found. He actually had a requirement that for every single event or film he did, the company hiring him also had to hire a certain number of homeless people and put them to work. I never watched a Robin Williams movie the same way after that. I’m sure that on his own time and with his own money, he was working with these people in need, but he’d also decided to use his clout as an entertainer to make sure that production companies and event planners also learned the value of giving people a chance to work their way back. I wonder how many production companies continued the practice into their next non-Robin Williams project, as well as how many people got a chance at a job and the pride of earning an income, even temporarily, from his actions. He was a great multiplier of his impact. Let’s hope that impact lives on without him. Thanks, Robin Williams- not just for laughs, but also for a cool example.
Brian Lord.org (via wonderwoundedhearers)

(Source: gypsy-hip, via everyfiredies)

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I remember being the only student in year seven who didn’t have a mobile phone - even though my parents had offered to buy me one for my birthday. I asked for a notebook and pens instead - you know the colourful glitter pens.

And btw I still don’t own an i-pad 

I remember being the only student in year seven who didn’t have a mobile phone - even though my parents had offered to buy me one for my birthday. I asked for a notebook and pens instead - you know the colourful glitter pens.

And btw I still don’t own an i-pad 

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Ah Poppy these remind me so much of you! You can take the Scotsman out of the highlands but he will still live the same.
Up yer kilt!

Ah Poppy these remind me so much of you! You can take the Scotsman out of the highlands but he will still live the same.

Up yer kilt!

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Rage on the Page

Flicking through some boxes this morning looking for a fish…yep fish…and cam across my old writing journals. Thought I could share. This one I wrote in high school - its a satirical piece. Let’s just say my English teacher and I did not get along very well. So let’s say we would be in year nine perhaps.  

RAGE ON THE PAGE

"Now do you know what we call this?" she asked, stabbing my page with her pen.

I stared down blankly at my page long introduction. She didn’t really expect me to answer her but asking the question knowing I couldn’t answer without saying something inappropriate or wrong must have given her a good power trip. She stabbed my page again. “Rage-on-the-page” she pronounced each word clearly and directly. “We’ve gone from one extreme to the other” she stated bluntly. “And I’m not impressed.” I lifted my gaze to level with hers. I was not going to be beaten by the old bird. She held the gaze in return, her beady blue eyes scouting out any slight movements – a blink, a twitch of my nose – but I didn’t give her the satisfaction and returned her gaze emotionlessly.

 

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Filed under shortstory satire English Highschool creativewriting